• blackourstory:

    DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLACK TULSA? IF NOT… WHY NOT?

    This horrific incident has been well documented, everywhere: from YouTube videos of survivor interviews to PBS Lesson Plans for school teachers. Please do your Google diligence:

    • From May 30 to June 1, 1921, white citizens of Tulsa bombed burned and shot up the “Little Africa” section of Tulsa FOR 18 HOURS STRAIGHT
    • Why would they do that? That same old lame excuse, a Black man supposedly did something to a white woman. But the real reason was ECONOMIC JEALOUSY. Whites may have called it Little Africa derisively, but there is a reason that Black Tulsa is known as Black Wall Street
    • In addition to the 300 Blacks killed, and over 1,000 residential homes burned to the ground, also destroyed were:
    • The Mt. Zion Baptist Church and five other churches; the Gurley Hotel, Red Wing Hotel, and Midway Hotel; the Tulsa Star and Oklahoma Sun newspaper offices; Dunbar Elementary School; Osborne Monroe’s Roller-Skating Rink; the East End Feed Store; the Y.M.C.A. Cleaners; the Dreamland Theater; a drug store, barbershop, banquet hall, several grocery stores, dentists, lawyers, doctors, and realtors offices; a U.S. Post Office Substation, as well the all-black Frissell Memorial Hospital. All told, marauding gangs of savage whites destroyed 40-square-blocks of Black economic and entrepreneurial prosperity!

    64 years after the first bombing of an American city was committed against the Black residents of Tulsa… the second bombing of an American city took place in Philadelphia when the city bombed the black members of the MOVE organization. (see the blackourstory archive for details). 

    Isn’t it a shame that 76 after the bombing of Tulsa, when Timothy McVeigh blew up the Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City, most historically illiterate Americans - including American “journalists” - responded as if it were the first time such a horror had been visited on Oklahoma. If only we knew.

    While there are many lessons to be drawn from this, a few questions that stick out to me are these:

    • If the answer to Black second-class treatment from whites in America is supposedly to become the ultimate American capitalists…the ‘model minorities’… how do you explain Tulsa 1921?
    • For those Black folk who think that the sole answer to Black people’s problems is simply more Blacks becoming business owners and more Blacks spending money with other Blacks… how did that work out for our people in Tulsa in ‘21?
    • Considering not only Tulsa, but Rosewood, Florida, and many other thriving all-Black towns that you may know of that all met the same fate at the hands of murderous, envious, lazy crackers… WHEN ARE WE GOING TO ACKNOWLEDGE AND TAKE SERIOUSLY THE IDEA THAT BLACK WEALTH (ESPECIALLY ALL-BLACK WEALTH) WILL NEED TO BE PROTECTED WITH PHYSICAL FORCE?

    There is a reason that Marcus Garvey AND Elijah Muhammad had armies of trained Black men as a huge part of their organizations. Many of us Black folk took those great men as jokes, yet NO BLACK LEADERS SINCE THOSE TWO have reached the same heights of economic and ideological success and unity of Black people. 

    Not only do we need to LEARN THIS HISTORY, we need to start taking these events men and movements MORE SERIOUSLY, and doing some CRITICAL HISTORICAL ANALYSIS if we are ever to stop being on the bottom rung of every metric in American life. Not just some casual or accidental reading of history; some CRITICAL. HISTORICAL. ANALYSIS.

    TULSA 1921 was real. PHILLY 1985 was real. Will it happen again?

    (via devilwearsfubu)

  • ruinedchildhood:Drake and Nicki Minaj in the anaconda video

    ruinedchildhood:

    Drake and Nicki Minaj in the anaconda video

    (Source: madeupmonkeyshit, via laughbitches)

  • hashiramass:

solarsenpai:

hoodkage:

infamousindigochild:

sosa0250:

Plz

41

D. get this bullshit out my fucking sight

Nigga said….41Public education is a joke

but the answer is 41 though

Solving in order, you must multiply before you add. So 40 + (40x0) +1= 41.

    hashiramass:

    solarsenpai:

    hoodkage:

    infamousindigochild:

    sosa0250:

    Plz

    41

    D. get this bullshit out my fucking sight

    Nigga said….41

    Public education is a joke

    but the answer is 41 though

    Solving in order, you must multiply before you add. So 40 + (40x0) +1= 41.

    (via guccimaneuver)

  • (Source: ForGIFs.com, via 4gifs)

  • wet-monsoon:

    oktober2nd:

    lana-loves-lingua-latina:

    if “barnacles” is a curse word in Spongebob, then how do you explain Barnacle Boy’s name

    He’s a fuck boy

    image

    (via fuckyeahloldemort)

  • therealhamster:

    touching yourself after a long vacation

    image

    (via strangeparkings)

  • shuttersmiley:

beethreefour:

frankensteinfanclub:

thackarybynx:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

majiinboo:

frankensteinfanclub:

im losing my mind

My white friend’s mom made this exact meal when I spent the night in 10th grade. It felt like chewing on dust

oh
my
god

do poc not eat chicken and vegetables ?

Lmfao look at this comment

I’m so confused because this is a genuine meal in England? is this some inside usa joke i dont get or something

The joke is that ya’ll had the nerve to invade 90% of the earth for spices and then not use a single one.

    shuttersmiley:

    beethreefour:

    frankensteinfanclub:

    thackarybynx:

    euthanizeallwhitepeople:

    majiinboo:

    frankensteinfanclub:

    im losing my mind

    My white friend’s mom made this exact meal when I spent the night in 10th grade. It felt like chewing on dust

    oh

    my

    god

    do poc not eat chicken and vegetables ?

    Lmfao look at this comment

    I’m so confused because this is a genuine meal in England? is this some inside usa joke i dont get or something

    The joke is that ya’ll had the nerve to invade 90% of the earth for spices and then not use a single one.

    (via mcqueefer)

  • night-catches-us:

    kb-saransar:

    "According to the FBI, there have been 129 confirmed white Christian terrorists in the last 20 years. That includes Timothy McVae, the uni-bomber, the Atlanta Olympics bomber and dozens of family planning centers and abortion clinics. Muslims? 19. Which would make white people the most likely demographic to commit a terrorist attack. So watch your mouth before you call me a terrorist or I’ll knock your fucking teeth out.

    image

    (via mcqueefer)

  • 2damnfeisty:
  • 8 Heartbreaking Cases Where Land Was Stolen From Black Americans Through Racism, Violence and Murder

    jessehimself:

    In his 2007 documentary Banished, filmmaker Marco Williams examined four examples of primarily white communities violently rising up to force their African-American neighbors to flee town. This became one of the techniques used to sabotage Black land ownership, a devastating trend in the 19th and…

  • thecivilwarparlor:

Before Rosa Parks- There Was Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
1846 – She began her amazing career as a writer by publishing her first book of poetry, Forest Leaves, at the age of 21.
1858 – She refused to give up her seat or ride in the “colored” section of a segregated trolley car in Philadelphia (100 years before Rosa Parks) and wrote one her most famous poems, “Bury Me In  A Free Land,” when she got very sick while on a lecturing tour. Her short story “The Two Offers” became the first short story to be published by an African American.
1859 – A dedicated abolitionist, Harper was one of the few public figures who did not abandon John Brown after his failed effort at Harpers Ferry, instead writing to him and staying with his wife, Mary, at the home of Lucretia Mott (Philadelphia’s leading Quaker Abolitionist) for the two weeks preceding his hanging.
1865 – In the immediate post-Civil War years, Harper returned to the lecture circuit, focusing her attentions on education for the formerly enslaved, on the Equal Rights Movement and on the Temperance Movement.
Despite all of her remarkable accomplishments, Frances E.W. Harper’s name cannot be found in most history books. 
 http://www.moonstoneartscenter.org/category/francesharper/

    thecivilwarparlor:

    Before Rosa Parks- There Was Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

    1846 – She began her amazing career as a writer by publishing her first book of poetry, Forest Leaves, at the age of 21.

    1858 – She refused to give up her seat or ride in the “colored” section of a segregated trolley car in Philadelphia (100 years before Rosa Parks) and wrote one her most famous poems, “Bury Me In  A Free Land,” when she got very sick while on a lecturing tour. Her short story “The Two Offers became the first short story to be published by an African American.

    1859 – A dedicated abolitionist, Harper was one of the few public figures who did not abandon John Brown after his failed effort at Harpers Ferry, instead writing to him and staying with his wife, Mary, at the home of Lucretia Mott (Philadelphia’s leading Quaker Abolitionist) for the two weeks preceding his hanging.

    1865 – In the immediate post-Civil War years, Harper returned to the lecture circuit, focusing her attentions on education for the formerly enslaved, on the Equal Rights Movement and on the Temperance Movement.

    Despite all of her remarkable accomplishments, Frances E.W. Harper’s name cannot be found in most history books. 

     http://www.moonstoneartscenter.org/category/francesharper/

    (via jessehimself)

  • descendants-of-brown-royalty:

Africans Contributions to Rome
Writer’s Note: This article is a response to the latest hit movie, “The Gladiator,” which is only minimally factual. Historically there were far more Africans in the Roman Empire than what was depicted in the movie, but that is Hollywood and Hollywood reflects racist American culture.The ancient Greeks and Romans did not display any hard core race prejudice as is evidenced today. What they did display was an attitude that manifested itself as that of superior toward the subordinate. The Romans were what could be considered a colonial power—actually a conquering power is better—and they brought captives from different parts of the world—especially Africa.The point must be made at this juncture that not all Africans in Rome were slaves, or servants. On the contrary, some were writers, generals, philosophers, and emperors (a good example of a Roman general was Septimius Serverus, whom the Antiochene chronicler, John Malalas, said was dark-skinned). Moreover, a number of African slaves in Rome became prominent citizens and contributed to Roman culture.The African in the Roman Empire worked, lived without fear of racial animosity, entertained, and in many respects worshipped the same gods at the same place of worship together with other slaves, servants and freedmen. Seneca, the Roman statesman, philosopher, and intellectual said that among his own people the African’s color was not noticeable.It must be said that despite this statement by Seneca there was some somatic classifying of Africans, Roman group stereotyping, even Romanocentric behavior regarding the “Aethiops,” a term widely used to describe Africans. However, I will limit my brief study to the positive aspects of the Africans in Rome. I am compelled to say, however, that the amicable relationship that had existed between ancient Greece and Africa (Aethiops/Ethiopia) did not develop in a continual progressive manner between Africans and Romans. The Greeks told us through their art, literature and scholars of the greatness of Africans/Aethiops/Blacks. The Romans, on the other hand, viewed the Africans from a political and cultural perspective. This, I believe, was predicated on the fact that the Roman populace had little contact with Africans prior to conquest, and most importantly their subjugation by the African general, Hannibal of Carthage, left them with bitter memories. Carthage had flourished for seven hundred years and was the seat of commercialism and education. The Romans after they conquered Carthage, out of jealousy, destroyed the great libraries they found at Carthage. some of the libraries (books and manuscripts) they gave to their Numidian allies. The Carthaginians had records of all their achievements. Unfortunately, the only Roman writers that referred to those manuscripts were Sallust and Pliny.Excluding the above mentioned factors as they relate to the early behavior and attitude of the Romans’ toward the Africans, most Africans/Aethiops were acknowledged for their cultural contributions to Roman society, or rather the Roman Empire. There was no law which prohibited Africans from assuming roles of responsibility and authority.In fact, as stated earlier, Africans became emperors, writers, philosophers, entertainers, generals and popes. After centuries of subjugating African people, the Romans became more acquainted with their subjects and their impeccable character and talents.Historical models are: Tiro, an African born a slave about the year 103 B. C. in Arpium, a city of Latium. He was born on the estate of Cicero, the Roman statesman and lawyer. In fact, it was Tiro who invented shorthand. When Cicero, who was still his slave master died, Tiro opened a shorthand school in Rome. He died in 4 B. C. Terence, another African was born about 190 B. C. He was sent to Rome as a slave and was bought by a Roman Senator, Terentius Lucanus, who named Terence after him. He was emancipated because of his extraordinary talents. He wrote six plays and his works were studied with great interest. He was/is highly regarded as one of the greatest humanists of all time. He wrote: “Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto” (I am a man and nothing human is alien to me). Terence died in 159 B. C. Fronto was another exceptional African writer; he taught the Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius, who was up to a point depicted accurately in the movie. There was Apuleius another African writer, and Slavius Julians, an African who edited the Paraetorian Edict.On another note as it relates to our subject, Lusius Quietus was one of Rome’s greatest African generals (in the movie it is Maximus, he was of minor significance). Quietus served under Emperor Trajan. The Emperor named him his successor to the Imperial Purple. Quietus and other African soldiers defended the Dacians. Moreover, when the Jews revolted, Trajan sent Quietus to suppress the revolt, which he did with extreme severity. The Jews called the rebellion “The War of Quietus.”Similarly, African soldiers distinguished themselves under the reign of Emperor Diocletian. Interestingly, at least ten Africans became Emperors of Rome. They are listed on the historical record as the following: Macrinu, Firmus, Emilianus, Septimius Serverus, Pescennius Niger, Aquilus Niger, Brutidius Niger, Q. Caecilus Niger, Novius Niger, and Trebius Niger who was a proconsul in Spain.Africans were authorities on medicine and they were often quoted by Caelius Aurelianus and Galen.Other noted Africans were Domituis Afer, orator, Arnobius Afer, Christian writer; and Victorianus Afer, a scholar of rhetoric whose statue was erected in the forum of Emperor Trajan.With regard to the subject of religion, three Africans became popes in Rome. They were Victor 189-199 A. D., Melchiades 311-312; and St. Gelasius 496 A. D. It was Victor who sent a letter to the Eastern Churches requesting them to observe Easter on the same day as the Western Churches. The Eastern Churches refused and Victor excluded them from his communion. Afterwards, Victor was killed in the sixth persecution under Emperor Serverus. It is befitting to say that all three of these African popes contributed immensely to the development of Christianity in Rome.Continuing with religion, Saint Benedict the Moor is a saint of the Catholic Church. He was born at Fradella, a village of the Diocese of Messina in Sicily in 1526; he died April 4, 1589. His parents were slaves from Ethiopia. Because of Benedict’s religious piety, their master freed him. Furthermore, owing to his strict virtues he was made superior of the monastery of Santa Maria de Jesus at Palermo. He devoted his life to caring for the sick and needy. He became known as “The Holy Negro.” He was sought by persons from every class on matters of religion and other human concerns. He died at the age of 63; as a consequence of his God-filled life, a vigorous cult developed immediately after his death. His veneration became especially popular in Italy, Spain, and South America. The city of Palermo chose him as its patron saint. He was pronounced Blessed in 1743 by Pope Benedict XVII and was canonized in 1807 by Pope Pius VII.In conclusion, color prejudice seems to have developed in the first century A. D. as a phase of the struggle among Christianity, Judaism, and Paganism. Furthermore, the French anthropologist, Topinard, believes the Rabbis of the fifth century were the first to stress differences of race and color. The historical record asserts that he is correct.Topinard states, “In the first century when Christianity was beginning to establish itself in Rome the doctrine of a separate creation for whites and Africans was defended by the Babylonian Rabbis and later by Emperor Julian. In 415 A. D. when one council was debating whether the Ethiopians/Africans were descended from Adam and the theory they were not was making considerable progress, St. Augustine in his “City of God” interjected and declared that no true Christian would doubt that all men, of no matter what form, color, or height were of the same protoplasmic origin.These early Rabbis did say with conviction that a Black skin was the result of a “curse” on them by Noah. The signs of this “curse” said the Rabbis were a “Black skin, misshapen nose, lips and twisted hair.”Lastly, Africans in ancient Rome before the philosophical structure of color prejudice and racism, like others conquered by the Romans, were treated as captives. There is no historical record from my studies that suggest wanton cruel treatment on the basis of color or ethnicity. A slave was a slave whether he was a Syrian, Thracian, or an African. The Romans after becoming accustomed to Africans from various parts of Africa and their varying complexions treated them with consideration and respect.References:———————————————————————————————Romans and Blacks, By Lloyd A. Thompson (University of Oklahoma Press, 1990)Septimius Serverus: The African Emperor, By Anthony R. Birley (Yale University Press, 1988)Blacks in Antiquity: Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, By Frank M. Snowden (Cambridge University Press, 1970)Before Color Prejudice, By Frank M. Snowden (Cambridge University Press, 1984)African Glory The Story of Vanished Negro Civilizations, By J. C. deGraft Johnson (Black Classic Press, 1986)History of The African People Vol. II Africans in Europe, By G. K. Osei (The African Publication Society, 1971)
descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

    descendants-of-brown-royalty:

    Africans Contributions to Rome

    Writer’s Note: This article is a response to the latest hit movie, “The Gladiator,” which is only minimally factual. Historically there were far more Africans in the Roman Empire than what was depicted in the movie, but that is Hollywood and Hollywood reflects racist American culture.

    The ancient Greeks and Romans did not display any hard core race prejudice as is evidenced today. What they did display was an attitude that manifested itself as that of superior toward the subordinate. The Romans were what could be considered a colonial power—actually a conquering power is better—and they brought captives from different parts of the world—especially Africa.

    The point must be made at this juncture that not all Africans in Rome were slaves, or servants. On the contrary, some were writers, generals, philosophers, and emperors (a good example of a Roman general was Septimius Serverus, whom the Antiochene chronicler, John Malalas, said was dark-skinned). Moreover, a number of African slaves in Rome became prominent citizens and contributed to Roman culture.

    The African in the Roman Empire worked, lived without fear of racial animosity, entertained, and in many respects worshipped the same gods at the same place of worship together with other slaves, servants and freedmen. Seneca, the Roman statesman, philosopher, and intellectual said that among his own people the African’s color was not noticeable.

    It must be said that despite this statement by Seneca there was some somatic classifying of Africans, Roman group stereotyping, even Romanocentric behavior regarding the “Aethiops,” a term widely used to describe Africans. However, I will limit my brief study to the positive aspects of the Africans in Rome. I am compelled to say, however, that the amicable relationship that had existed between ancient Greece and Africa (Aethiops/Ethiopia) did not develop in a continual progressive manner between Africans and Romans. The Greeks told us through their art, literature and scholars of the greatness of Africans/Aethiops/Blacks. The Romans, on the other hand, viewed the Africans from a political and cultural perspective. This, I believe, was predicated on the fact that the Roman populace had little contact with Africans prior to conquest, and most importantly their subjugation by the African general, Hannibal of Carthage, left them with bitter memories. 

    Carthage had flourished for seven hundred years and was the seat of commercialism and education. The Romans after they conquered Carthage, out of jealousy, destroyed the great libraries they found at Carthage. some of the libraries (books and manuscripts) they gave to their Numidian allies. The Carthaginians had records of all their achievements. Unfortunately, the only Roman writers that referred to those manuscripts were Sallust and Pliny.

    Excluding the above mentioned factors as they relate to the early behavior and attitude of the Romans’ toward the Africans, most Africans/Aethiops were acknowledged for their cultural contributions to Roman society, or rather the Roman Empire. There was no law which prohibited Africans from assuming roles of responsibility and authority.

    In fact, as stated earlier, Africans became emperors, writers, philosophers, entertainers, generals and popes. After centuries of subjugating African people, the Romans became more acquainted with their subjects and their impeccable character and talents.

    Historical models are: Tiro, an African born a slave about the year 103 B. C. in Arpium, a city of Latium. He was born on the estate of Cicero, the Roman statesman and lawyer. In fact, it was Tiro who invented shorthand. When Cicero, who was still his slave master died, Tiro opened a shorthand school in Rome. He died in 4 B. C. 

    Terence, another African was born about 190 B. C. He was sent to Rome as a slave and was bought by a Roman Senator, Terentius Lucanus, who named Terence after him. He was emancipated because of his extraordinary talents. He wrote six plays and his works were studied with great interest. He was/is highly regarded as one of the greatest humanists of all time. He wrote: “Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto” (I am a man and nothing human is alien to me). Terence died in 159 B. C. 

    Fronto was another exceptional African writer; he taught the Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius, who was up to a point depicted accurately in the movie. There was Apuleius another African writer, and Slavius Julians, an African who edited the Paraetorian Edict.

    On another note as it relates to our subject, Lusius Quietus was one of Rome’s greatest African generals (in the movie it is Maximus, he was of minor significance). Quietus served under Emperor Trajan. The Emperor named him his successor to the Imperial Purple. Quietus and other African soldiers defended the Dacians. Moreover, when the Jews revolted, Trajan sent Quietus to suppress the revolt, which he did with extreme severity. The Jews called the rebellion “The War of Quietus.”

    Similarly, African soldiers distinguished themselves under the reign of Emperor Diocletian. 

    Interestingly, at least ten Africans became Emperors of Rome. They are listed on the historical record as the following: Macrinu, Firmus, Emilianus, Septimius Serverus, Pescennius Niger, Aquilus Niger, Brutidius Niger, Q. Caecilus Niger, Novius Niger, and Trebius Niger who was a proconsul in Spain.

    Africans were authorities on medicine and they were often quoted by Caelius Aurelianus and Galen.
    Other noted Africans were Domituis Afer, orator, Arnobius Afer, Christian writer; and Victorianus Afer, a scholar of rhetoric whose statue was erected in the forum of Emperor Trajan.

    With regard to the subject of religion, three Africans became popes in Rome. They were Victor 189-199 A. D., Melchiades 311-312; and St. Gelasius 496 A. D. It was Victor who sent a letter to the Eastern Churches requesting them to observe Easter on the same day as the Western Churches. The Eastern Churches refused and Victor excluded them from his communion. Afterwards, Victor was killed in the sixth persecution under Emperor Serverus. It is befitting to say that all three of these African popes contributed immensely to the development of Christianity in Rome.

    Continuing with religion, Saint Benedict the Moor is a saint of the Catholic Church. He was born at Fradella, a village of the Diocese of Messina in Sicily in 1526; he died April 4, 1589. His parents were slaves from Ethiopia. Because of Benedict’s religious piety, their master freed him. Furthermore, owing to his strict virtues he was made superior of the monastery of Santa Maria de Jesus at Palermo. He devoted his life to caring for the sick and needy. He became known as “The Holy Negro.” He was sought by persons from every class on matters of religion and other human concerns. He died at the age of 63; as a consequence of his God-filled life, a vigorous cult developed immediately after his death. His veneration became especially popular in Italy, Spain, and South America. The city of Palermo chose him as its patron saint. He was pronounced Blessed in 1743 by Pope Benedict XVII and was canonized in 1807 by Pope Pius VII.

    In conclusion, color prejudice seems to have developed in the first century A. D. as a phase of the struggle among Christianity, Judaism, and Paganism. Furthermore, the French anthropologist, Topinard, believes the Rabbis of the fifth century were the first to stress differences of race and color. The historical record asserts that he is correct.

    Topinard states, “In the first century when Christianity was beginning to establish itself in Rome the doctrine of a separate creation for whites and Africans was defended by the Babylonian Rabbis and later by Emperor Julian. In 415 A. D. when one council was debating whether the Ethiopians/Africans were descended from Adam and the theory they were not was making considerable progress, St. Augustine in his “City of God” interjected and declared that no true Christian would doubt that all men, of no matter what form, color, or height were of the same protoplasmic origin.

    These early Rabbis did say with conviction that a Black skin was the result of a “curse” on them by Noah. The signs of this “curse” said the Rabbis were a “Black skin, misshapen nose, lips and twisted hair.”

    Lastly, Africans in ancient Rome before the philosophical structure of color prejudice and racism, like others conquered by the Romans, were treated as captives. There is no historical record from my studies that suggest wanton cruel treatment on the basis of color or ethnicity. A slave was a slave whether he was a Syrian, Thracian, or an African. 

    The Romans after becoming accustomed to Africans from various parts of Africa and their varying complexions treated them with consideration and respect.

    References:
    ———————————————————————————————
    Romans and Blacks, By Lloyd A. Thompson (University of Oklahoma Press, 1990)
    Septimius Serverus: The African Emperor, By Anthony R. Birley (Yale University Press, 1988)
    Blacks in Antiquity: Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, By Frank M. Snowden (Cambridge University Press, 1970)
    Before Color Prejudice, By Frank M. Snowden (Cambridge University Press, 1984)
    African Glory The Story of Vanished Negro Civilizations, By J. C. deGraft Johnson (Black Classic Press, 1986)
    History of The African People Vol. II Africans in Europe, By G. K. Osei (The African Publication Society, 1971)

    descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

    (via jessehimself)

  • (Source: we-r-fame, via jessehimself)

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